Cruises: Cruise ship built for ‘some of the most extreme waters on the planet’ revealed | Cruise | Travel

A cruise ship built to journey across perilous waters will soon be ready for completion. Hurtigruten’s MS Roald Amundsen is also the world’s first hybrid-powered cruise ship. The ship completed its first sea trials in the fjords along the western coast of Norway this weekend. The advanced hybrid powered expedition cruise ship accommodates 530 guests.

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Cruises: Cruise ship built for ‘some of the most extreme waters on the planet’ built

It features groundbreaking green technology such as battery packs and a specially designed ice-strengthened hull.

The MS Roald Amundsen is designed and constructed with sustainability at the core of every detail.

After delivery this spring, MS Roald Amundsen’s maiden season includes expedition cruises along the Norwegian coast.

It will travel to Svalbard and Greenland, before traversing the legendary Northwest Passage and heading south to Antarctica.

Hurtigruten are also currently working on MS Roald Amundsen’s sister ship MS Fridtjof Nansen at Kleven Yard in Ulsteinvik, Norway.

A third hybrid powered expedition vessel is also on order which will be added to the fleet in 2021.

Cruises: Hurtigruten’s MS Roald Amundsen is also the world’s first hybrid-powered cruise ship (Image: Hurtigruten)Cruise ship: Hurtigruten’s MS Roald Amundsen includes expedition cruises along the Norwegian coast (Image: Hurtigruten)

“I am very pleased with the results of the sea trial. The Kleven employees, along with our sub-contractors, has done a great job leading up to the successful sea trial,” Kleven’s CEO Olav Nakken said after MS Roald Amundsen’s return to the yard Monday morning.

“With several sustainable innovations and this being a highly technical complicated ship, it is important for us to verify that all systems work as planned,” Asbjørn Vattøy, project director at Kleven, said.

Hurtigruten have proven to be hugely innovative when it comes to being eco-friendly.

Last year, Hurtigruten announced they planned to replace fuel with a rather disgusting product instead.

The cruise line will use dead fish to power their ships – a much greener method.

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Known as liquefied biogas, it is made from dead fish and decomposed organic waste and will cost $826 million over three years to implement. 

The alternative fuel will be used alongside battery packs and natural gas to run the ships and reduce their emissions.

It is hoped to be introduced to six of the 17 ships by 2021.

Hurtigruten’s removal of plastic early last year included single-use plastic lids, straws, bags and cups.

A report released in January claimed cruise ship decks are so polluted they have as much as some of the world’s heavily polluted cities such as Beijing in China. 

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